Tags: ‘Drywall’

Bonus Room…or Bedroom?

 

I can think of so many ways to use this great idea!  Turning a second family room or bonus room into an additional bedroom will add value to your home.  Your three bedroom home can easily become a four bedroom home.  Let me help you design something that meets the needs of your family.Attic Bedroom

Flooring…Now or Later?

Upon the completion of the sheetrock phase, installation of some of your flooring may begin.

floor-333165_1280If you select natural hardwood flooring, the wood must acclimate to the environmental conditions of your new home. Delivery of the product you selected ten days to two weeks ahead of installation is absolutely necessary. Natural wood will expand and contract with current weather conditions, more or less moisture in the home causes the wood to expand (more moisture) or contract (less moisture). Imagine the result of installing moist wood when you turn the heat on in your new home…the drying out will cause gaps between the planks. The opposite occurs if you install dry wood in your new home…the moisturizing of the planks will cause them to expand, forcing the gaps to buckle up and cause “cupping”. A number of alternatives now available in pre-finished wood flooring allow for installation at a later date, but acclimation must still be included in the process.

That brings us back to decisions, decisions, decisions! If you elect to use natural hardwood, installation takes place prior to the trim phase. Following acclimation, a subcontractor will cover the subfloor with black felt paper that acts as a moisture barrier and then staples the hardwood planks in place. Once again, the flooring needs to rest before sanding and the application of the first coat of stain and polyurethane. During the initial sanding and application of stain phase, other activities in the home are curtailed. The resumption of other activities may resume when the floors have completely dried, after a protective cover of paper is placed over them. The last coats of polyurethane are applied near the end of completion of your new home.

Ceramic TileIf you have decided to use any tile flooring in your new home, installation begins while newly delivered hardwood acclimates. The first step includes installation of cementitious board in the tile areas, including walls for showers and tub surrounds. This board creates a hard, solid surface under the tile, and insures that grout joints will not crack. The tile you selected will then be set in place with mortar, allowed to dry, and grouted. Covering finished tile floors prevents grout from becoming dirty before the application of sealer.

Carpet

The installation of carpeting and sheet linoleum occurs during the end phase of completion, but before the final coat of polyurethane on natural hardwood floors.

 

The order of the building process prevents accidental damage to floor surfaces and costly repairs. Have questions? Drop me a note, and I will be more than happy to try to help you.

Drywall…a muddy process!

After insulation installation is completed and inspected, drywall installation and finish begins.

house1Large boom trucks pull up on your lot and hoist sheetrock through an upstairs window designed to open and allow this process to take place (both sashes are designed for removal). Specialty sheetrock designed to repel moisture will line the bathroom areas, and the rest of your rooms will take shape with the hanging of the sheetrock. The majority of the sheetrock in your new home will be ½” thick, on both walls and ceilings.

Building codes do require some walls use a fire resistant sheetrock which will be 5/8” thick. The walls in a garage that are common to living areas should be covered with 5/8” thick sheetrock.

Sheetrock hung with screws requires a maximum spacing of 12” between screws, while sheetrock hung with nails requires a maximum spacing of 7” between nails on ceilings, and a maximum spacing of 8” on walls. As a home dries and settles, nails can back out causing “nail pops” and necessitating repairs. I strongly urge you to require screws of the proper length be used to hang all of the sheetrock in your new home.

hanging_sheetsProperly hung sheetrock will have the joints staggered so that they do not line up over the top of each other. Much like a brick pattern, you should see joints staggered over the walls. Note that sheetrock comes in different lengths and widths. To minimize waste, sheetrock should be ordered as close to the size of a room as possible. A very simple example follows – your room is 12’ x 12’ with a 9’ ceiling, so two sheets 54-1/2” x 12’ will cover one wall without waste. In a perfect world, all of your rooms would be sized to minimize sheetrock waste. If your General Contractor is on site, minimizing waste should not be an issue.

Upon the completion of hanging, the taping and floating process begins. Specialty paper tape is applied over all joints in a generous bed of sheetrock mud. The excess mud blends the edge of the tape into the wall surface and create a smooth wall. After the initial coat of mud dries, an additional coat is applied, allowed to dry, and then sanded to a smooth finish.

Years of experience have shown me that the majority of repairs, required after a final walk-thru on your completed home, emanate from drywall repairs. Following the application of the prime coat of paint, shine a bright light over all drywall surfaces, identify, and repair imperfections before the final coat of paint. This is important because repairs and paint touchup will never blend as well as a full coat of paint on your wall.

Upon completion, the plywood subfloors in your home need a good cleaning to scrape up and remove excess mud, and you are ready to begin tile and hardwood flooring.